1709 Blog: for all the copyright community

Thursday, 20 August 2015

The Future of the Music Business: a new edition

Does the music business have a future? Despite all the gloom and doom, one would like to think that the answer is an emphatic "yes", if only because  The Future of the Music Business, by US entertainment attorney Steve Gordon, is now in its fourth (and, one guesses, by no means its final) edition.

According to the book's website:
" ... the purpose of the fourth edition of the FUTURE OF THE MUSIC BUSINESS ... is to provide a road map for success in the music business – not only for musicians, songwriters and producers – but also for entrepreneurs and industry professionals. Technology has profoundly changed the recording industry and the music publishing business. Entirely new rules, business practices and models have emerged at breathtaking speed including in the several years since the publication of the third edition in 2008. The fourth edition explains the most recent rules, business practices and models, and offers insights into how to take advantage of them.

The purpose of this website is to update the book and to promote it to readers who have not bought a copy by offering segments of the book’s contents including the Foreword by Amanda Palmer and Table of Contents. ..."
This US book comes out on 20 August and our good friend Amanda Harcourt -- a founder member of this weblog -- contributed a chapter on music licensing in the hope that readers in the USA might remember there is a licensing landscape that stretches beyond the familiar territory of the 50 States.

You can buy this book on Amazon here.

2 comments:

Peter said...

Does this mean he's got it wrong three times so far?

Anonymous said...

Looks interesting. The problem with books like this though, is they often seem to be out-dated if not moving into obsolesence by the time they actually come out... (even more so than legal reference texts, whcih at least carry some historical relevance!) Maybe a more 'future-proofed' system of creation and delivery would be useful (e.g. episodic e-books?)